May 2022 Safety Meeting

Steve gives updates on aircraft status, and also about the pending PGA Tour in June that will impact ramp and hangar space as well as operations (e.g. touch and goes, etc).

Nate covers the recent incident in FL with the Cessna 208 Caravan (N333LD) landed by a passenger, tie-ins to last month’s topic of altered mental status / in-flight medical emergencies, and passenger briefs.

May 2022 Safety Meeting Video

April 2022 Safety Meeting

Great to be back in person! This month, we covered some medical emergencies, signs, and symptoms related to altered mental status, specifically stroke, hypoxia, and CO poisoning. This isn’t just about pilots, but considerations regarding your passengers too.

Special thanks to Rick for bringing some Paramedic insights and knowledge to the discussion.

This one ran a little long, and we’re rusty on the camera work after all this time, but the discussion was good and I highly encourage you to sit through the video in its entirety.

Link to the CDC stroke video for direct watching here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mkpbbWZvYmw

March 2022 Safety Meeting

Hopefully the last video-only meeting in a long time!

Steve discusses current events, and Nate shows an incident that happened earlier this year in Northern California involving a student pilot with a stuck throttle (fully open) emergency.

Looking forward to seeing everyone in April!

P.S. Please, of you have one of the Stratus ADS-B receivers in your possession, please return it to Steve ASAP! Thanks!

Original incident youtube file link: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nrsJ1lhQ9Pc

Original article on AOPA: https://www.aopa.org/news-and-media/all-news/2022/march/08/student-handles-throttle-trouble-on-final?utm_source=epilot&utm_medium=email

February 2022 Safety Meeting video

Steve discuss some updates on aircraft status and operations. Then a review of go-arounds with an interesting video from Chief Pilot Mike MacMann with (some funny but also many serious) examples of when go-arounds would be the preferred course of action.

Fun fact: Mike has personally landed on the short runway near the beach in the video (it’s in St. Barts in the Carribbean) and can personally speak to the difficulty landing there.

Finally, a plug for an upcoming FAAST seminar on Aviation Emergency First Responder Training that I took, good for 4 hours of WINGS or MA/CT CEUs (for EMTs/Nurses). A practical session will be in May in Groton, CT.

December 2021 Safety Meeting Video

Unfortunately, no spiral ham or other yummy treats this year. Hopefully we’ll be able to resume that next year.

In the meantime, please find the video below with some thoughts from Steve, then Nate shares some thoughts from our awesome mechanics, and shares an experience hopefully all can learn from.

Apologies for the video/audio being out of sync and the audio choppiness, the video segments with Steve were unfortunately corrupted before I could assemble it all for publishing.

slides here:

New Hangar Bifold Door Operation Training

In this short video, Steve shows how to operate the new hangar bifold door. Please watch as soon as practicable and before attempting to operate the new door.

Key takeaways are:

  • Ensure both locking handles are in DOWN position before operating the door
  • Ensure the Electrical transfer is ON
    • If it’s locked OFF, then you shouldn’t be trying to operate the door
  • You must hold the UP or DOWN button to move the door, letting go stops movement
    • When lowering the door, don’t stop when you think it’s touching the ground
    • Keep holding DOWN until it stops itself.
    • This ensures no unnecessary tension is on the door straps and prolongs door life
  • The STOP button does nothing
  • Keep the area in front and behind the door clear to allow movement without damage
  • Always raise the door past the 2nd horizontal bar on the frame to ensure vertical clearance
  • Please be careful and mindful of the door frame, hangar rash due to wing vs hangar door frame will be expensive for everyone
  • The new floor is slippery, especially when wet, please be careful and tread slowly
    • Move airplanes slowly when on this surface to avoid sliding